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Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:23  
3
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Video Description

Katherine George, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, explains that a common symptom of a salivary gland tumour is feeling a lump within the gland, and that any patient who feels a lump within their head and neck should go for a consultation. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

3
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VIEWS
 0:23   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

A common symptom of the salivary gland tumour is feeling a lump within the gland and any patient that feels a lump within the head and neck should attend for a consultation.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:55  
4
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Video Description

Surgeon Katherine George explains that sialendoscopy is an endoscopic procedure of a salivary gland duct. sialendoscopy is partly a diagnostic procedure, but it can also be therapeutic as well. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

4
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:55   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

Sialendoscopy is an endoscopic procedure of a salivary gland duct. So it's using micro-endoscopes less than two millimetres in diameter to directly go into the salivary gland duct. And then the picture comes up on a screen you can actually see the lining of the duct and see any obstructions. There might be what we call mucus plug, thick saliva blocking the ducts. Maybe small stones, maybe narrowing of ducts which are called stenosis, and they can also cause obstruction of salivary flow. And so, sialendoscopy is partly a diagnostic procedure, but it can also be therapeutic as well.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:50  
4
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Video Description

Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Katherine George specialises in minimally invasive salivary gland treatments. She explains that the salivary gland produces saliva, which increases when you eat, so it's important that there is no blockage in the duct. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

4
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VIEWS
 0:50   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

Salivary gland surgery is quite a broad topic. What I really specialise in is minimally invasive salivary gland treatments. Some of the commonest things are obstruction of the salivary glands. And you can get, commonest symptoms are swelling of the salivary glands particularly on eating which would last a short period of time, maybe up to an hour or so, and go down. And it's caused by a blockage in a salivary gland duct. So the salivary gland produces saliva it increases the production of saliva when you eat. And if there is a blockage in the duct then the saliva backs up and swells in the gland.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

10
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Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George discusses the step by step process of what patients should do if they suspect they have a salivary gland stone.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

10
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:42   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

The first thing is to come for a consultation where a clinical examination can be carried out. Often I would request an ultrasound scan as an ultrasound can pick up even quite small stones within the salivary gland. There are always a variety of options available to remove stones and then this can be discussed once the site of the stone within the gland is known and the size of the stone and that information is obtained from the ultrasound scan results.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 1:05  
7
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VIEWS
Video Description

A stone breaker is a device that is used to fragment large salivary gland stones into small bits that can be can be flushed out of the gland naturally or removed by small baskets explains Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George. It is used to remove salivary gland stones endoscopically.
http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

7
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:05   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

A stone breaker is a device that is used to fragment large salivary gland stones into small bits that can be can be flushed out of the gland naturally or removed by small baskets. It is a carbon dioxide driven system which produces energy that's used to fragment the stone via a long, thin wire that's placed on an endoscope. An endoscope is a long, thin, flexible tube with a camera at one end so that you can place this directly into the month through the salivary glands and see the stone directly. The wire of the stone breaker goes through the endoscope and then the picture that you get on the camera shows the stone being fragmented. Then those bits are removed either by a small basket or come out of the gland spontaneously.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

14
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VIEWS
Video Description

Recovery time for salivary gland surgery is no more than a few hours, explains Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George of The Face Surgeons. As the procedure is minimally invasive under local anaesthetic, most patients can be back at work on the same day.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

14
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:48   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

One of the key benefits of minimally-invasive surgery is that the down time is much less. So for many procedures for small stones it can be done under a local anaesthetic as more of an office-based procedure under some...an hour or two of local anaesthetic, and then be back at work later the same day. You can get some swelling of the gland afterwards, a little bit of discomfort needing paracetamol or ibuprofen, but it shouldn't be anything much more than that. There's a small risk of infection, but that risk is low and I always cover with antibiotics.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:55  
53
TOTAL
VIEWS
Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George at The Face Surgeons explains that the cause for salivary gland stones is unknown but dehydration is thought to play a part in producing them.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

53
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:55   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

Well, nobody really knows what causes a salivary gland stone, but we all produce microscopic stones that pass out of the salivary glands with the saliva when we eat, etc. But, we think that at times of dehydration, these small, microscopic stones can get lodged in the curves and the kinks of the ducts, and then act as a nidus for crystal development, so they can get lodged in the duct and then grow slowly, about a millimetre a year. And the salivary duct is about 2 mm in diameter, so once the stone gets 2 to 3 mm, it can start causing intermittent blockage of the duct and the symptoms of swelling.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 1:17  
4
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Video Description

Salivary gland tumours are growth within the salivary glands explains Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George at The Face Surgeons. The most commonest gland to have a tumour within it is the parotid gland which sits just in front and below the ear, and most of the tumours within this gland benign.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

4
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:17   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

Salivary gland tumours are growth within the salivary glands. We have both major and minor salivary glands. And the major salivary glands are just the larger ones, and there are three pairs of major salivary glands in the head and neck. There's also hundreds of minor, very small salivary glands within the mouth that you can feel along your lower lip. They're also on the on the palate as well, and growths can form within these. The most commonest gland to have a tumour within it is the parotid gland which sits just in front and below the ear, and most of the tumours within this gland benign. So they grow slowly within the gland. They don't spread through the body. It's not a cancer per se, but if left for a long period of time they will grow and grow and grow. And there's, over an over 20 years or so, there's a small chance of it turning to something malignant. So it's worth having them removed early on.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

6
TOTAL
VIEWS
Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George at The Face Surgeons describes the treatment options available to patients who have salivary stones including removal techniques and breaking up the stones into fragments.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

6
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:43   ChannelSalivary Gland PlaylistSalivary Gland FAQ  

Well, any stone production in a gland would cause symptoms, and so for symptom relief the stone needs to be removed. And what I specialise in is removing the salivary gland stone itself, instead of removing the gland, which is a much bigger procedure, and for large stones, that is the commonest surgical procedure to perform in my centres. Salivary gland stones, when they're small, can be removed by a procedure called sialoendoscopy, which is using a very small camera, a little endoscope, less than two millimetres in size, that goes directly into the duct, and then the stone could be removed by small wire baskets. If stones are a little bit larger, sometimes they need to be fragmented, and there are a variety of procedures to fragment a stone. One of the more exciting new developments has been a technique using a piece of equipment called StoneBreaker, which is a pneumatic lithotripsy device. So you put a small wire probe down through the endoscope, you see this thing directly, and then there's a little impulse of...it's powered by carbon dioxide cylinders, so a little impulse directly onto the stone, and it fragments it into small pieces, and the small pieces can be removed by a basket. When stones are a lot larger, then it's a surgical approach to release the stone. But again, that can be done by leaving the gland alone, so you don't need to have the gland out.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

The Face Surgeons
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