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Helen Witherow, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons, says it usually takes about 18 months for orthognathic surgery, and then another six months or a year of orthodontics after that. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/ The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London. All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

13
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VIEWS
 0:29   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

So it usually takes probably about two or three years for full treatment. Usually about 18 months for orthodontics, surgery, and then another six months or a year of orthodontics after.

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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow
Consultant Maxillofacial and Skull Base and Facial Plastic Surgeon
Helen Witherow is a highly specialized facial surgeon with over 30 years experience. She uses techniques developed from her experience working in different specialties Plastics, Cosmetic, ENT and Maxillofacial surgery and has includes reconstructive procedures acquired during her Craniofacial fellowship at Great Ormond street Hospital. At the heart of her belief is that facial appearance matters. Read full bio view less


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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow

81
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Caroline Mills, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons discusses the possible complications with jaw surgery which include bleeding and the risk of infection.
http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

81
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:15   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

When it comes to the actual surgery itself, patients need to be aware of the risks and complications. The main risks of jaw surgery are, like any other surgery, bleeding and infection. The actual jaws, themselves, are actually broken in a very controlled fashion, and the jaws are fixed together with some small little plates and screws. These plates and screws are made of titanium. They're a very inert metal, and they usually stay in, but very occasionally, they can get infected and need to be removed. There's not normally a problem with the bone healing because the bone heals in about six to eight weeks. Other risks include numbness or altered sensation. In the lower jaw, specifically, there's a nerve that runs right through the jaw that supplies sensation to the lower lip and the gums and the teeth in this area, and patients very often will have some altered sensation there after the surgery, and that can last for a number of months before it comes back to life fully. And, very occasionally, they can get some slightly altered sensation that persists for a long period of time. In these patients, usually they aren't too concerned about it, but obviously, you need to be aware about it before considering surgery.

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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic surgeon
As a specialist in surgery of the face Caroline has degrees in both medicine and dentistry. She holds the general FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) as well as the FRCS (OMFS), the specialist FRCS exam for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, have undertaken nine years of specialist training in Head and Neck Surgery as well as having undertaken fellowships in Craniofacial Surgery and Cosmetic Surgery. Read full bio view less


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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills

Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow
 1:05  
8
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Video Description

Orthognathic surgery explains Helen Witherow, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons, is surgery to the jaws to correct their alignment.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

8
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:05   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Orthognathic surgery is surgery to the jaws, and surgery to the top jaw or surgery to the bottom jaw or the chin. It's usually undertaken for people who were born with deformities so that their jaws are not in the correct position. And that can have a number of impacts on a person. It can cause functional problems in that their teeth don't meet properly, and that could cause lots of problems when they're eating, pain in their jaws and probably most importantly is the cosmetic appearance to people. And orthognathic surgery changes the shape of the jaws so that the patients have a much more normal and average appearance.

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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow
Consultant Maxillofacial and Skull Base and Facial Plastic Surgeon
Helen Witherow is a highly specialized facial surgeon with over 30 years experience. She uses techniques developed from her experience working in different specialties Plastics, Cosmetic, ENT and Maxillofacial surgery and has includes reconstructive procedures acquired during her Craniofacial fellowship at Great Ormond street Hospital. At the heart of her belief is that facial appearance matters. Read full bio view less


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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:46  
8
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Video Description

Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Katherine George at The Face Surgeons clinic explains that orthognathic surgery is a jaw-straightening surgery. It also involves a period of orthodontic treatment. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

8
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:46   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Orthognathic surgery is jaw-straightening surgery. And sometimes the jaws don't grow in the correct relationship to each other and that can lead to problems with the bite, could affect speech or the health of the teeth, and it can also impact the facial appearance. And those issues can be addressed by orthognathic surgery which is jaw-straightening surgery but also involves a period of orthodontic treatment as well.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

14
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Video Description

Caroline Mills, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons talks us through the process of jaw surgery and what patients can expect at every stage of the procedure. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

14
TOTAL
VIEWS
 2:10   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The process of jaw surgery usually starts with the patient seeing both the surgeon and seeing the orthodontist separately. The surgeon will explain what's involved with the surgery, and the orthodontist will explain what's involved with the brace work. They will also do some moulds of your teeth so we can look at the way your teeth bite together before you start any treatment. And you will also have some x-rays, and also some scans, as well. Once the orthodontist and the surgeon have got all the records together, then what we will do is, normally, meet with the patient, and their family ideally, so that we can go through the whole process again with them so they can understand how things are going to work, how long their orthodontics is likely to take before they have surgery, and how long the orthodontics will take after surgery, because the orthodontic process is usually a continuous process during their treatment. The braces can go on the teeth. As long as the patient wishes to proceed with treatment, braces can then be put on the teeth, and braces can be either the old-fashioned train track silver braces, or they can have white braces on the front of the teeth, or more commonly these days, patients are looking to what's known as lingual orthodontics, which is where they have the braces on the back of the teeth, which means that they're obviously not seen. Once the brace work is ongoing and the teeth have generally been better aligned, we can then look to doing the surgery, and this can be, usually, anywhere between about a year to 18 months after the braces, but sometimes that can vary, as well. Once they come to have the surgery, then obviously, we see them again, have another chat about the surgery, make sure they're happy to proceed, and we go through the process, and then they'll come and have the surgery. They will usually be in hospital for one or two nights after the surgery. It can be a time when patients, obviously, are swollen after the surgery, and they will generally be on a very soft diet for the first two or three weeks after the surgery. Pain itself is usually not a major feature. Everyone thinks that jaw surgery's extremely painful. It often isn't that painful. You would generally have some painkillers and some antibiotics after surgery, but usually, after 10 days to 2 weeks, it's not too uncomfortable.

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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic surgeon
As a specialist in surgery of the face Caroline has degrees in both medicine and dentistry. She holds the general FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) as well as the FRCS (OMFS), the specialist FRCS exam for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, have undertaken nine years of specialist training in Head and Neck Surgery as well as having undertaken fellowships in Craniofacial Surgery and Cosmetic Surgery. Read full bio view less


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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills

7
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Video Description

Helen Witherow, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, says that complications of orthognathic jaw surgery usually include the those associated with having general anaesthetic, as well as bleeding due to patients with high blood pressure, or post-op eating difficulties. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

7
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VIEWS
 2:33   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Complications of orthognathic surgery can be like any surgery. There are complications occasionally of a having general anaesthetic. General anaesthetics nowadays are very safe, but nothing is 100% safe, and so there is a risk of the general anaesthetic. The specific risks in surgery can be divided into early, intermediate, and late. The early risks are that sometimes you can get quite lot of bleeding. Generally that's the reason that most things heal very well on the face, that the blood supply is very good, but sometimes you can get quite a lot of bleeding. We work very closely with the anaesthetists, so we can lower the blood pressure and give various drugs that reduce the amount of bleeding that sometimes is a problem, and patients can be a bit anaemic after their surgery. Second is infection. Luckily, this is extremely low with orthognathic surgery, but it can occur. We give patients antibiotics before and after their surgery. Also, eating is very difficult straight off to the surgery so that patients are often on a limited diet for about six weeks. Soft diet, liquids to start with. And then, long-term complications. With the lower jaw, there is a nerve that runs through the bottom jaw, and that almost always gets lightly bruised during the surgery. In the short term, it's great because it's not painful. A lot of patients worry that the surgery is going to get very painful. But because the nerves often get bruised, they find that actually is not painful, but they tend to be numb, and that makes them feel quite swollen. Generally, the nerves recover over a period of time, and probably, in 80% of patients, the nerves recover completely. But in 20% of patients, the recovery isn't complete, and they may be left with some numbness of their lip or their chin. We never had anybody yet who said they'd rather have not had the surgery and would rather not had the numbness.

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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow
Consultant Maxillofacial and Skull Base and Facial Plastic Surgeon
Helen Witherow is a highly specialized facial surgeon with over 30 years experience. She uses techniques developed from her experience working in different specialties Plastics, Cosmetic, ENT and Maxillofacial surgery and has includes reconstructive procedures acquired during her Craniofacial fellowship at Great Ormond street Hospital. At the heart of her belief is that facial appearance matters. Read full bio view less


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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:44  
8
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VIEWS
Video Description

Sometimes, the jaws don't grow in a correct relationship to each other and this leads to a number of problems, impacting the facial appearance, says Katherine George, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. That can be addressed by orthognathic surgery. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

8
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:44   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Bimaxillary surgery is two-jaw surgery, and it's part of orthognathic surgery, which is jaw-straightening surgery. Sometimes, the jaws don't grow in a correct relationship to each other and this leads to problems with the bite, which can give problems eating food or maybe affect the speech, or the health of the teeth. It can also impact the facial appearance and those things can be addressed by orthognathic surgery.

read more view less

Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

12
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Video Description

Patients should be aware of a number of things prior to having orthognathic jaw surgery says Caroline Mills, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons. This includes the discomfort that patients can have from wearing braces and the difficulties around speech. http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/ The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London. All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

12
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:49   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Patients should be aware of a number of things about orthognathic jaw surgery. First of all with the braces, if they got to wear braces, if they choose to have lingual braces which is the braces on the back of the teeth. They can be quite uncomfortable especially to start with, and patients can have slight difficulties with talking, usually they'll get around that quite quickly. But it can be something that can be a bit uncomfortable to start with. As the orthodontics goes on, the actual gap between the top and the bottom teeth, whichever way the jaws are, will get worse because the angulation of the teeth will change and so therefore if somebody had a smallish gap to start with, it will actually get worse, and patients need to be aware of that before they can have the surgery to put the two back into the right position.

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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic surgeon
As a specialist in surgery of the face Caroline has degrees in both medicine and dentistry. She holds the general FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) as well as the FRCS (OMFS), the specialist FRCS exam for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, have undertaken nine years of specialist training in Head and Neck Surgery as well as having undertaken fellowships in Craniofacial Surgery and Cosmetic Surgery. Read full bio view less


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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills

13
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VIEWS
Video Description

Caroline Mills, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons explains what orthognathic jaw surgery is, and who is suitable for undergoing this procedure.
http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

13
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:50   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Orthognathic jaw surgery is usually undertaken in patients who have got a disproportion in their jaws, and whose...their occlusion, i.e. the way they bite their teeth together, is not as what perceived would be normal. They might have a small jaw where their lower jaw is set back and they've got a big gap between the top teeth and the bottom teeth. In these procedures, we can move the lower jaw forward so they get a more normal bite. Other types of jaw surgery include patients who've got a big jaw and so their lower teeth sit in front of their top teeth. Then we can do procedures to both take the top jaw forward and the bottom jaw back so that they can get their bite correct.

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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic surgeon
As a specialist in surgery of the face Caroline has degrees in both medicine and dentistry. She holds the general FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) as well as the FRCS (OMFS), the specialist FRCS exam for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, have undertaken nine years of specialist training in Head and Neck Surgery as well as having undertaken fellowships in Craniofacial Surgery and Cosmetic Surgery. Read full bio view less


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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills

Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
 1:09  
14
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VIEWS
Video Description

Caroline Mills, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons talks through the process of orthognathic jaw surgery and how a surgeon and orthodontist work together to ensure the teeth align and fit into the best position following surgery.
http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

14
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:09   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Orthognathic jaw surgery is a process that can take a reasonable amount of time because it's a process that's done as a multidisciplinary team. So, we have a surgeon who will obviously be doing the actual jaw surgery, and we'll tell you all about the jaw surgery, but it's usually combined with an orthodontist who will need to do some preparatory brace work in order that the teeth will meet together properly after the surgery. When patients have jaws that don't meet together in the normal fashion, the natural action of the body is to try and make the teeth meet together. It's, therefore, often the angulation of the teeth in these patients, is what we call compensated teeth, which means that the lower teeth may be either set too far forward, protruding too far, or may be too far offset back, and the upper teeth exactly the same way. So, the orthodontist will straighten and align those teeth and get them to the correct angulations so that when they come to have the surgery and the jaws are moved into the best position, the teeth will fit together properly.

read more view less

Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic surgeon
As a specialist in surgery of the face Caroline has degrees in both medicine and dentistry. She holds the general FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) as well as the FRCS (OMFS), the specialist FRCS exam for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, have undertaken nine years of specialist training in Head and Neck Surgery as well as having undertaken fellowships in Craniofacial Surgery and Cosmetic Surgery. Read full bio view less


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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills

13
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VIEWS
Video Description

Typical patients for orthognathic jaw surgery are boys and girls in their late teens says Caroline Mills, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons. But there has been an increase in older patients with jaw discrepancies who are undergoing this procedure so they can feel more bite and feel better about their teeth and facial appearance.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

13
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:57   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Typical patients for orthognathic surgery are patients who present in their late teen-ages, when they've just finished growing. We don't want to do this type of surgery on patients who are still growing, because there is a lot of facial growth in the teenage years, so usually for girls and boys, it's around 17 or 18 years of age. However, we're seeing a much bigger rise in older patients, in 20s, 30s, 40s, and even 50s, who have got jaw discrepancies and I think that's mainly because they weren't necessarily offered treatment at the time when they were younger, it's becoming much more commonplace surgery now, and therefore patients are still seeking to have this type of surgery, because they would like to be able to bite and feel more comfortable about their teeth and their facial appearance.

read more view less

Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills
Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic surgeon
As a specialist in surgery of the face Caroline has degrees in both medicine and dentistry. She holds the general FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) as well as the FRCS (OMFS), the specialist FRCS exam for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, have undertaken nine years of specialist training in Head and Neck Surgery as well as having undertaken fellowships in Craniofacial Surgery and Cosmetic Surgery. Read full bio view less


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Caroline Mills
Caroline Mills

8
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VIEWS
Video Description

Helen Witherow, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon explains what is involved with undergoing orthognathic surgery.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

8
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:49   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Involves initially history and examination and correct assessment of the patient. Then it's a lengthy treatment that involves not just the surgeon but also the orthodontist. We work very closely with the orthodontist because the teeth have to be moved into the right position so that when the teeth have been moved to the right position we can move the bones and then the occlusion where the teeth meet is correct and also facial harmony is good as well.

read more view less

Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow
Consultant Maxillofacial and Skull Base and Facial Plastic Surgeon
Helen Witherow is a highly specialized facial surgeon with over 30 years experience. She uses techniques developed from her experience working in different specialties Plastics, Cosmetic, ENT and Maxillofacial surgery and has includes reconstructive procedures acquired during her Craniofacial fellowship at Great Ormond street Hospital. At the heart of her belief is that facial appearance matters. Read full bio view less


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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow

5
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VIEWS
Video Description

Helen Witherow, Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon at The Face Surgeons explains the benefits of having orthognathic surgery.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

5
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:21   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The benefits can be twofold. I'd say one of the most important benefits is the appearance of a person, and their self-confidence usually improves significantly after the surgery. It's one of the most satisfying areas of surgery to do because patients find, after, the way people respond to them is often very different. Like it or not, we all make decisions and impressions on patients in the first few seconds we see them, depending on their facial appearance. Often, that's not right, but it's human nature and it's what we do. So the increasing self-confidence is one thing. And the other thing is the functional appearance, so that patients often say to us, they don't want to smile anymore and they find eating in public is something that they don't like. So those are the two big improvements from having this surgery.

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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow
Consultant Maxillofacial and Skull Base and Facial Plastic Surgeon
Helen Witherow is a highly specialized facial surgeon with over 30 years experience. She uses techniques developed from her experience working in different specialties Plastics, Cosmetic, ENT and Maxillofacial surgery and has includes reconstructive procedures acquired during her Craniofacial fellowship at Great Ormond street Hospital. At the heart of her belief is that facial appearance matters. Read full bio view less


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Helen Witherow
Helen Witherow

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:35  
34
TOTAL
VIEWS
Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George explains the risk of upper jaw surgery.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

34
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:35   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The risks of upper jaw surgery includes pain bleeding, swelling, or risk of infection. The roots of the teeth can be damaged but there is very low risk of that. There is also a nervous supply sensation to the cheeks which can be stretched during the surgery but that tends to be temporary, and a vast majority of people that recovers completely.

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Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

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Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George explains the risks of surgery for genioplasty, including pain, swelling and the risk of infection.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

52
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:41   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The risks of surgery are some pain for which you will be given painkillers afterwards, some bleeding, swelling and there's a risk of infection and antibiotics are prescribed to minimise that risk. There's also some risk of numbness to the lower lip and chin and sometimes the front teeth can feel a little bit numb as well and that's because the nerve that supplies those areas can be stretched during the surgery. Usually it recovers completely but there's a small chance of permanent altered sensation.

read more view less

Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 1:00  
94
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Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George explains the risks associated with lower jaw surgery which include bleeding, swelling and the chance of infection.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

94
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:00   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The risks of any surgery are pain, bleeding, swelling, or infection. But specific to lower jaw surgery there's also a nerve that runs through the lower jaw bone to supply the lower lip and chin with sensation, and this can be bruised or damaged during the surgery and this can lead to numbness of the lower lip and chin which is altered sensation. It can feel a little bit like having a dental injection for a filling, and as the injection wears off you get some tingling of the lower lip or chin. Usually it's temporary and recovers over a period of weeks to months, but there is a small chance of some permanent altered sensation to the lower lip or chin.

read more view less

Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 1:00  
73
TOTAL
VIEWS
Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George discusses the step-by-step process of how upper jaw surgery is performed.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

73
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:00   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

Upper jaw surgery is performed, again, under a general anaesthetic with the patient asleep, and usually takes an hour and a half to two hours. When asleep, a cut is made inside the mouth through the gum just above the roots of the upper teeth. And then the bone can be cut above the roots of the upper teeth to enable it to move independently from the rest of the skull bones. It can then be moved forward or sometimes moved up or slightly down into the pre-plan position and held in place by little metal plates and screws which lie on the bone and are covered over by the gum. And that can... They're held in place as the bone heals. They stay in place forever, they're not removed. And they integrate with the bone.

read more view less

Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 1:00  
48
TOTAL
VIEWS
Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George explains the step-by-step process of how lower jaw surgery is performed.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

48
TOTAL
VIEWS
 1:00   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The surgery is carried out under a general anaesthetic with the patient asleep and usually takes about one and half to two hours. Then a cut is made inside the mask so there are no scars on the outside right by the lower wisdom tooth. Then the jaw bone is cut, is split and that enables the tooth-bearing segment of the lower jaw to be moved independently of the jaw joint. The lower jaw can then be moved forward or moved backwards into the preplanned surgical position and held in place with little metal plates and screws which lie along the jaw bone to stabilise it and those are covered up by the gum, so the gum is stitched back together with some dissolving stitches.

read more view less

Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


share

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Katherine George
Katherine George

Katherine George
Katherine George
 0:48  
9
TOTAL
VIEWS
Video Description

Consultant Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon, Katherine George explains how genioplasty is performed.

http://www.thefacesurgeons.co.uk/

The mission of The Face Surgeons is to provide anybody who requests or needs to have surgery of the face to have the best possible advice from a specialist in their field of care. Our main practice is situated on Wimpole Street in the heart of London.

All of our surgeons are highly trained specialists in all aspects of facial surgery. We have one oculoplastic surgeon, one ear, nose and throat specialist, and 3 maxillofacial surgeons. Between all members of The Face Surgeons team we aim to provide patients with a comprehensive and well explained treatment plan for your concerns and problems.

9
TOTAL
VIEWS
 0:48   ChannelJaw Surgery PlaylistJaw Surgery FAQ  

The surgery is performed under a general anaesthetic with the patient asleep, and it takes about an hour to do. A cut is made inside the mouth just under the roots of the teeth, and below a nerve which comes out of the lower jaw bone, which supplies the lower lip and chin with sensation. The jaw bone is then cut below that nerve and then can be moved into the plant position and held in place by metal plates and screws, which integrate with the bone and are covered up by the gum, which is stitched in place with dissolving stitches. The plates aren't removed and they're there permanently.

read more view less

Katherine George
Katherine George
Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon
Miss Katherine George is a Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon appointed to one of the leading teaching hospitals and major trauma centres in London and she specialises in conditions of the face, head and neck. She is qualified in both dentistry and medicine achieving distinction when she graduated from St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital Medical School. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and has won several awards and prizes for both academic and clinical excellence throughout her career. Read full bio view less


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Katherine George
Katherine George

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